National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation Statement on Passing of Medal of Honor Recipient Gary Beikirch

ARLINGTON, TX – (December 26, 2021) – National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation President and CEO Chris Cassidy released the below statement on the passing today of Medal of Honor recipient Gary Beikirch:

“Gary was a true American hero. He displayed extraordinary courage on the battlefields of Vietnam and dedicated his life to encouraging and inspiring generations of Americans. As a counselor and man of deep faith, Gary touched and changed thousands of lives. The impact of his uplifting influence will be felt for years to come as his goodness lives on in those who knew him. We offer our deepest sympathies to his family as they, together with America and the Medal of Honor community, grieve an amazing man.”

Gary Beikirch Medal of Honor Action

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Sgt. Beikirch, medical aidman, Detachment B-24, Company B, distinguished himself during the defense of Camp Dak Seang. The allied defenders suffered a number of casualties as a result of an intense, devastating attack launched by the enemy from well-concealed positions surrounding the camp. Sgt. Beikirch, with complete disregard for his personal safety, moved unhesitatingly through the withering enemy fire to his fallen comrades, applied first aid to their wounds and assisted them to the medical aid station. When informed that a seriously injured American officer was lying in an exposed position, Sgt. Beikirch ran immediately through the hail of fire. Although he was wounded seriously by fragments from an exploding enemy mortar shell, Sgt. Beikirch carried the officer to a medical aid station. Ignoring his own serious injuries, Sgt. Beikirch left the relative safety of the medical bunker to search for and evacuate other men who had been injured. He was again wounded as he dragged a critically injured Vietnamese soldier to the medical bunker while simultaneously applying mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to sustain his life. Sgt. Beikirch again refused treatment and continued his search for other casualties until he collapsed. Only then did he permit himself to be treated. Sgt. Beikirch’s complete devotion to the welfare of his comrades, at the risk of his life are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

Related Articles

CDR Lawson Ramage, USS Parche (SS-384)

In the early years of World War II, Lawson “Red” Ramage served aboard USS Grenadine (SS-210) and commanded the USS Trout (SS-202).  While aboard Trout, Ramage had damaged the Japanese light-carrier Taiyo in

Read More »
National Medal of Honor Museum

Through education, leadership, and inspiring spaces for learning and reflection, the National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation preserves and expands the impact of the 3,511 award recipients and the more than 40 million Americans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces since the Civil War.

Copyright © 2022 the National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation
Site designed and managed by